Poetry Club Talks…Seamus Heaney Pt2

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-skuqq-1162636

Topic: Seamus Heaney Pt2
Host: Ron
Poems: “Mid-term Break”, “Villanelle For An Anniversary”, “The Cure of Troy”
Recorded: December 16, 2021

Seamus Heaney Poems

Seamus-Heany_image_Hanvey

Ron guides Poetry Club through another riveting discussion on select poems by Seamus Heaney. Amory and Linda share their experience of attending a reading by Heaney while visiting Ireland.  We take a look at the different rhyme landscapes of his work, moods, mastery of storytelling, and more.  Join us for the deliberation of a much-loved poet.

“Heaney was a professor at Harvard from 1981 to 1997, and its Poet in Residence from 1988 to 2006. From 1989 to 1994, he was also the Professor of Poetry at Oxford. In 1996 he was made a Commandeur of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and in 1998 was bestowed the title Saoi of the Aosdána. Other awards that he received include the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize (1968), the E. M. Forster Award (1975), the PEN Translation Prize (1985), the Golden Wreath of Poetry (2001), the T. S. Eliot Prize (2006) and two Whitbread Prizes (1996 and 1999).[3][4] In 2011, he was awarded the Griffin Poetry Prize and in 2012, a Lifetime Recognition Award from the Griffin Trust.

Heaney is buried at the Cemetery of St Mary’s Church, Bellaghy, Northern Ireland. The headstone bears the epitaph “Walk on air against your better judgement”, from one of his poems, “The Gravel Walks”.[8]”

From Wikipedia:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seamus_Heaney

Poetry Club Talks… is produced by Chickadee Productions

Poetry Club Talks…Seamus Heaney Pt1

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-eqpjx-1157024

Topic: Seamus Heaney
Host: Ron
Poems: “Digging” and “Follower”
Recorded: December 4, 2021

Seamus Heaney Poems

Ron hosts the discussion of one of his favorite poets, Seamus Heaney.  Seamus Justin Heaney, born April 1939 – died August 30, 2013, was an Irish poet, playwright, and translator. He received the 1995 Nobel Prize in Literature.  We look at the created word pictures and word choice, share about the life and awards of this famous poet.  In part one we begin an exploration of poems that seem to bookend each other.  Will we get to the “root” of their meaning?  Perhaps, or perhaps we’ll save it for part 2. Please join us.

Seamus Heaney in 1971 Photo credit Jack McManus

“Seamus Heaney is widely recognized as one of the major poets of the 20th century. A native of Northern Ireland, Heaney was raised in County Derry, and later lived for many years in Dublin. He was the author of over 20 volumes of poetry and criticism and edited several widely used anthologies. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995 “for works of lyrical beauty and ethical depth, which exalt everyday miracles and the living past.” Heaney taught at Harvard University (1985-2006) and served as the Oxford Professor of Poetry (1989-1994). He died in 2013.”

Please visit https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/seamus-heaney

Poetry Club Talks is produced by Chickadee Productions

Poetry Club Talks…Rhyme

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-yaggt-103387f

Topic: Rhyme, The Authors Fancy
Host: Ron
Poems: Various (see attached)
Recorded: May 8, 2021

Selected Poems on Rhyme

Why do some poets rhyme and others do not?  Ron hosts this detailed look into the use of rhyme by famous poets such as Poe, Frost, Atwood, Browning, Dickinson, Marvell, and MacLeish.

Rons shares, I suggest that in reading the poems, many of which we have discussed previously, we focus on a few issues (there is overlap in the issues):

  • what is the purpose and/or appeal of rhyme for many poets?
  • what added value does rhyme provide?
  • with individual poems, does the rhyme enhance the poem’s quality or effectiveness, and how?
  • how well do the poet’s choices, as well as we can define them, serve the poem?

Ron is the host of the Poetry Club in Bellingham, Washington.  He is a retired poetry professor who taught poetry for 52 years from 1965 to 2017.  You’ll enjoy his sense of humor and intelligent insight into classic and contemporary poetry.

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All poems are the copyrighted material of each poet listed respectively.

Poetry Club Talks is produced by Chickadee Productions.  

Poetry Club Talks…Composition Styles Part 3

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-pdth8-f5ebb1

Topic: Composition Methods
Host: Ron Leatherbarrow
Poems: “Housekeeper”, “River Ink”, “Her Hands”
Recorded: December 19, 2020

In our final episode exploring personal styles of poetry composition, Shannon shares three poems written at different times, 2010, 2012, 2016, when her style shifted.  Her background in broadcasting plays an unexpected role, not only in her composition but also in the presentation.

Housekeeper, River Ink, & Her Hands

Photo by Amador Loureiro on Unsplash

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Poetry Club

Poetry Club

Poetry Club Bellingham

Hosted by Ron Leatherbarrow, retired poetry professor, 4th Sat, 10-12, at a Bellingham café. Classic poetry discussed, original poetry read.

Facebook Group Site: https://www.facebook.com/Poetryclubbellingham/

After taking Ron’s Intro to Poetry class Spring quarter I fell in love with this kind, intelligent, antidote-filled instructor.  I’m not the only one.  I organized a Saturday morning coffee follow-up with the other students and Ron; just a one day get-together.  Ron suggested, “How about people bring their own poetry to read, we can discuss a classic poem and maybe meet once a month.  Do you think people would like to do that?”  YES.

Poetry Club is now in it’s third month.  This is how easy it is to start a group.  If you are a writer who is looking for people who also suffer the affliction to write, start a group!  Make it open and public, hold it in a cafe, coffee house, book store, some place with nibbles & drinks. Set rules about giving constructive feedback and let participants know straight up that a “bully” will not be tolerated.  Create a “safe space.”  Writing and sharing is intimate.  Don’t underestimate the power of community!  Plant the seed, water it, and let it grow!

Here are the classic poems we will discuss for December:

 

Pied Beauty

Glory be to God for dappled things—
For skies of couple-colour as a brinded cow;
For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim
Fresh-firecoal chestnut falls; finches’ wings;
Landscape plotted and pieced—fold, fallow, and plough;
And all trades, their gear and tackle and trim.

All things counter, original, spare, strange;
Whatever is fickle, freckled (who knows how?)
With swift, slow; sweet, sour; adazzle, dim;
He fathers-forth whose beauty is past change;
Praise him.
–Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-89)

The Waking

I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.
I feel my fate in what I cannot fear.
I learn by going where I have to go.

We think by feeling. What is there to know?
I hear my being dance from ear to ear.
I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.

Of those so close beside me, which are you?
God bless the Ground! I shall walk softly there,
And learn by going where I have to go.

Light takes the Tree; but who can tell us how?
The lowly worm climbs up a winding stair;
I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.

Great Nature has another thing to do
To you and me; so take the lively air,
And, lovely, learn by going where to go.

The shaking keeps me steady. I should know.
What falls away is always. And is near.
I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.
I learn by going where I have to go.
–Theodore Roethke (1908-1963)