Poetry Club Talks…Wislawa Szymborska

Topic: Wislawa Szymborska
Host: Linda
Poems: On Death, without Exaggeration, Stage Fright, In Broad Daylight
Recorded: May 1, 2021

Poems by Wislawa Szymborska

Poetry Club Talks…Szymborska. The famous female Polish poet Wislawa Szymborska (1923-2012). If you haven’t heard of her or read her poetry, give yourself a treat. This show is an introduction to the person and her poems. Linda shares three of Szymborska’s poems published in “Polish Poetry of the Last Two Decades of Communist Rule: Spoiling Cannibals’ Fun”*

This 1996 Nobel Prize in Literature recipient takes her readers on a unique journey of word-scapes and concepts.

In awarding the prize, the Academy praised her “poetry that with ironic precision allows the historical and biological context to come to light in fragments of human reality.” Listen to The Club as we tour through her poetry and prose.

This program was produced by Chickadee Productions


*Poems by Wislawa Szymborska (1923-2012)
Source: Spoiling Cannibal’s’ Fun: Polish Poetry of the Last Two Decades of Communist Rule. Evanston, ILL: Northwestern University Press, 1993

Staycation

Happy May 4th!
Hey you missed it. I was at the beach. Didn’t see you there. What’s up with that? I went by myself and half of the town. Wrote a little draft of a poem, you can check it out below. I didn’t take my phone. I took two books, a notebook, and a mask just in case it got crazy out there. It did not get crazy. However, I do hope I got a tan. A tan would help make the dark circles under my eyes less notable.
The area where I live has been awarded the opportunity to go outside without a mask. As a citizen I am a little confused about the phases. Specifically, when will we reach the POST-pandemic phase. As a goal oriented person, I’d like to know what we are shooting for. The hospital in my town was not overrun with COVID cases like I see on the news, you know patients in the hallways, and lines of refrigerated cars loaded up with bodies. Thank goodness. According to the Washington State COVID Dashboard, there have been 378,225 deaths confirmed as COVID, and 91 of them from Whatcom County. I will keep an eye out for the target numbers the CDC wants to see in order to declare the pandemic OVER.

So I’m on vacation, day 4. I spent the first three days freaking out every 20-30 minutes thinking I had to be somewhere, call someone, or send an e-mail. Today, I think, I am finally chillin’. The beach is all over me and I’m not going to wash it off, because WebMD says “Enjoy it!”

Negative ions are odorless, tasteless, and invisible molecules that we inhale in abundance in certain environments. Think mountains, waterfalls, and beaches. Once they reach our bloodstream, negative ions are believed to produce biochemical reactions that increase levels of the mood chemical serotonin, helping to alleviate depression, relieve stress, and boost our daytime energy.
They are created in nature as air molecules break apart due to sunlight, radiation, and moving air and water. You may have experienced the power of negative ions when you last set foot on the beach or walked beneath a waterfall. 
Generally speaking, negative ions increase the flow of oxygen to the brain; resulting in higher alertness, decreased drowsiness, and more mental energy,” says Pierce J. Howard, PhD, author of The Owners Manual for the Brain: Everyday Applications from Mind Brain Research and director of research at the Center for Applied Cognitive Sciences in Charlotte, N.C.
“They also may protect against germs in the air, resulting in decreased irritation due to inhaling various particles that make you sneeze, cough, or have a throat irritation.”



—protects against germs and offers decreased irritation? Sounds perfect. I’m going back tomorrow. I’m guessing by the time Monday comes around I may be too mellow to move. I smiled a little thinking about going to bed without a shower, fading off to sleep with the smell of salty air in my hair. Not sure why but that sound SO romantic, kinda gross, but also romantic.


Draft: How Long Were You At Beach?

I arrived while the great Horse-Chestnut
shade still covered the long pine log

I saw a red kayak come in
I watched a yellow kayak go out
I saw a yellow kayak come in
I watched two green kayaks go out

I left before they returned
I left when the shade was gone

How I feel described in meme. I’m going back to my Longmire marathon.
Take it easy.



https://www.webmd.com/balance/features/negative-ions-create-positive-vibes
https://www.doh.wa.gov/Emergencies/COVID19/DataDashboard#dashboard

Poetry Club Talks…Jack Straw Fellows 2021 Part 2

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-e683q-101b250

Topic: Jack Straw Poets 2021
Host: Shannon
Poems: “anchor baby” and “porous”
Recorded: April 24, 2021

2021 Jack Straw Poets

This week Poetry Club discusses two more poems from the Jack Straw 2021 poets, S. Erin Batiste, Patrycja Humienik, and Abi Pollokoff.  Three brilliant and dynamic poets!  In this episode, we discuss Patrycja Humienik’s poems “anchor baby” and “porous”.  Poetry Club digs into each stanza while contemplating how personal experience plays into the interpretation.  Humienik masters her stories into a mold that most readers can wear, but each story folds into the shape of the reader’s mind.  Is a shout down a stairwell a scream of frustration or a playful yelp to catch an echo?

Poetry Club enjoyed discussing the 2021 Jack Straw Fellows work.  Bravo to all!

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jack_straw_seattle8yo8f.jpg

Levi Fuller, the Administrative Coordinator at Jack Straw, sent us this note and kind clarification about their program at the Jack Straw Cultural Center:

“I’m listening now, this is very cool. I did want to clarify one thing about our residency programs, of which there are three: The Writers Program alone is twelve writers each year, from a variety of genres (no set numbers for each); The New Media Gallery is four artists per year, and the Artist Support Program is 20 artists per year.

The WP Curator picks the Writers, and we have selection panels who pick the artists for the other programs. The three programs are totally different and don’t really overlap very much, though we always encourage collaboration between artists of different disciplines, and often someone will come in first in one program, and then return as an artist in a different program.

Thank you for sharing and helping to get the word out about our programs!”

PATRYCJA HUMIENIK 1

BIO

Patrycja Humienik, daughter of Polish immigrants, is a writer, performer & facilitator based in Seattle, WA. She serves as Assistant Poetry Editor with Newfound Org and Events Director for The Seventh Wave. Patrycja works for the University of Washington’s Office of Equity & Justice in Grad Programs, in service of underrepresented graduate students, faculty, and staff.  -quoted from her website.

Please visit her site to learn more about this stimulating poet.  Photo credit is Patrycja Humienik from her website:  https://www.patrycjasara.com/

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The poems attached belong to S. Erin Batiste, Patrycja Humienik, and Abi Pollokoff respectively.

Please visit the Jack Straw website to learn more about this fascinating program.
http://www.jackstraw.org/programs/writers/WritersForum/index.html#wp21

This program was produced by Chickadee Productions

About Poetry Club Talks…

Our NEW podcast logo. Look for it or search “Poetry Club Talks…” wherever you get your podcasts.

ABOUT POETRY CLUB TALKS…

Poetry Club Talks… costs about $30 a month to produce. Thirty people donating only a dollar a month can keep us talkin’! Please visit our Patreon site to learn how
https://www.patreon.com/PoetryClubTalks

Poetry Club is here with hopes to increase the understanding and appreciation of poetry and encourage the discussion of poetry in your neighborhood and around the world. Can talking about poetry bring understanding between neighbors? Can understanding bring us closer to living more peacefully together? We are willing to give it a try! Are you?

Find us on: GooglePodcasts , Spotify , AmazonMusic ,
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HISTORY

It started when the three of us took Ron’s “Introduction to Poetry” class at a local community college. We enjoyed it so much we asked Ron if he would like to continue the discussion in a casual atmosphere. On October 31, 2015, we met for coffee at a local cafe, and we’ve been meeting every month since. Soon, the news got around and we started to grow to about 8-10 people. Then, we got organized. Whether you’re a writer or admirer of poetry, or simply want to learn more about it, you’ll love these feel-good conversations.

Poetry Club discusses classical and contemporary poetry. Members take turns hosting discussions on the work of a different poet each week. Our perspectives are vernacular to academic, and everything in between. Currently, we are about 6-8 people who meet every Saturday online; a retired professor, a retired librarian, active poets, and a guy who just loves poetry, all fans of the written word.
Grab a cup of coffee or tea and join us!

Thank you for listening, participating, and exploring poetry with us.
This podcast is produced by CHICKADEE PRODUCTIONS

Poetry Club Talks…Jack Straw Poets 2021

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-scnqc-100b396

Topic: Jack Straw Writers 2021
Host: Shannon
Poem: “The Yellow Jackets” and “At Trader Joe’s in South Pasadena​”
Recorded: April 10, 2021

2021 Jack Straw Poets

This week Poetry Club discusses two poems from each of the three Jack Straw 2021 poets, S. Erin Batiste, Patrycja Humienik, and Abi Pollokoff.  Three brilliant and dynamic poets!  First up are two poems from Batiste.  Her website defines her as an “Interdisciplinary Poet & Storyteller, West Coast bred. Remotely based. World bound.”  Poetry Club enjoyed discussing the two poems.  We hope you will seek out Batiste’s books and add them to your collection.

Each year twelve writers/writing teams are selected by a curator, based on artistic excellence, diversity of literary genres, and a cohesive grouping of writers.

The Jack Straw Cultural Center is located in
Seattle’s University District at: 4261 Roosevelt Way NE, Seattle, WA

jack-straw-cultural-centerLS20140613_jackstra...

BIO
S. Erin Batiste is an interdisciplinary poet, storyteller, and author of the chapbook Glory to All Fleeting Things. In 2021 this year, she is the recipient of PERIPLUS, Jack Straw Writers, and the dots between fellowships, and is a Writer in Residence at The Studios at MASS MoCA, Prairie Ronde, and the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation. Her other recent honors include fellowships and support from Cave Canem, Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference-Rona Jaffe Foundation, Crosstown Arts, and Callaloo. Batiste is a reader for The Rumpus and her own Pushcart, Best New Poets, and Best of the Net nominated poems are anthologized and appear internationally in Michigan Quarterly Review, Puerto del Sol, and wildness among other decorated journals.” -from her website.

Please visit her website to learn more: https://www.sbatistewrites.com/

S. Erin Batiste

##

The poems attached belong to S. Erin Batiste, Patrycja Humienik, and Abi Pollokoff respectively.

Please visit the Jack Straw website to learn more about this fascinating program.
http://www.jackstraw.org/programs/writers/WritersForum/index.html#wp21

photo credits: S. Erin Batiste website, Jack Straw Cultural Center website.

Poetry Club Talks…Wallace Stevens poem The Snow Man

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-4xdsx-ff15e9

Topic: Wallace Stevens
Host: Lynn
Poems: “The Snow Man”
Recorded: March 27, 2021

The Snow Man Graph and Poem

This week at Poetry Club we ask what Is poetry analysis? Poetry analysis is examining the independent elements of a poem to understand the literary work in its entirety.  Poetry Club member Lynn will host the discussion on the poem “The Snow Man” by Wallace Stevens  (1879 – 1955) and we analyze the heck out of it.

Lynn sends us these notes:
“I’d like our discussion and reflections on this poem to move in the direction of exploring the mind watching our sensations and emotions while reading the poem…that does not hope to ‘solve’ the meaning of the poem… but expands the experience of the poem.”

Wallace-Stevens

BIO
Wallace Stevens (October 2, 1879 – August 2, 1955) was an American modernist poet. He was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, educated at Harvard and then New York Law School, and he spent most of his life working as an executive for an insurance company in Hartford, Connecticut. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for his Collected Poems in 1955.  credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallace_Stevens

This program was produced by Chickadee Productions

The Ugly Truth

Epiphany at 6:53am

So in the mid-2010s, I lived with a boyfriend. We moved in together after dating for about a year. I was looking for a place to live and he says, “move in with me.” So I did.

You learn a lot more about a person when you live with them. This guy had a massive DVD collection including the FULL season of “Friends”. He loved that show. I also learned that I was his first steady girlfriend in over 5 years. I was impressed that he worked two jobs and saved his money to reach a lifetime goal of owning a home by the time he was 40. He stopped going out, stopped socializing to reduce the temptation to spend money to reach this goal. He oversimplified his life; work, food, sleep and watched “Friends” and his other DVDs.

This is a new age in America. It is difficult for people under 40 to get into a home in most moderately populated areas, such as Washington State. Many that do make it into a home generally are a two-person income couple and live above their means on credit. Everything is expensive and wages are not going up anytime soon.

In a 2017 Harvard Study…

“In the study, the researchers determined affordability by people’s ability to pay 30 percent of their income or less on the cost of housing, which may include their mortgage, insurance, and taxes.

Homeownership keeps declining, according to the Joint Center for Housing Studies’ detailed and comprehensive 2017 State of the Nation’s Housing report, in part because home prices in many markets have continued to go up while wages have not kept pace. In 2016, “the homeownership rate fell to 63.4 percent, marking the 12th consecutive year of declines.””

I knew what he did was difficult. I was impressed by his focus and hard work. It was also very generous of him to share his home with me. We had a nice relationship and remain distant, but friends to this day.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 11718286-0-image-a-48_1554118010419.jpg
Remember this challenge “The Ugly Face Shelfie”

Here is the core of it. A few times during our relationship he’d occasionally make comments about my looks. He’d say, “you know sometimes you look like yourself, and other times you, you look…different.” When I inquired how and in what way, he responded um, as kindly as possible I suppose, sometimes I didn’t look so good, just different. Here it is 2021 and I still think about those comments. What was his perspective? What did he mean I don’t look like myself?

There it was. At 6:53 am this morning. An answer to a nine-year-old question landed on my head! My vanity badmintoned for ten years–am I beautiful but sometimes appear ugly, or am I ugly but occasionally look beautiful? I am human, so are other humans, we are all three-dimensional beings ugly and beautiful at the same time…depending on your perspective. By perspective, I mean exactly– where your eyeballs are in relationship to my face.

The human eye is better than any camera. The human organic experience is a higher definition than any sitcom. The Real Real is both beautiful and ugly, not homogenized drama processed for your entertainment.

How camera lenses work, photo credit: bounding dirtier piped Wombat
I’D LIKE TO THANK THE PANDEMIC…
Finding your perfect angle

All the online meetings the working class are enduring during the pandemic, I wonder will our perceptions change to a 2-D memory format? The camera lens mimics the human eye. It goes where a human can take it. Video composition is the art of framing the photo to correspond with a mode or message. There are 7 rules for better shot composition and framing:
The Rule Of Thirds.
Symmetry.
Leading Lines.
Leading Room & Head Room.
Depth.
Size Equals Power.
Break the Rules.

These are rules we don’t live by in our body, only in composition.

I wonder, perhaps, just maybe, if a person watches too much TV, too many hours on video games, attends only Zoom meetings, lives alone, stops seeing friends in real life…could they forget what normal 3-D interaction is like? In real life, the other bodies you interact with are not in perfect frames, with mood lighting, or wearing costumes that easily identify their personality. I believe my boyfriend was in transition. He was coming out of a dark five years that stripped him of his social skills. It diminished his perspectives to the point that he was shocked when his girlfriend expressed an infinite amount of expression. Perhaps as we slowly work our way out of the pandemic more studies and information will be produced regarding the anticipated awkward action of “being normal” again.

Humans are infinite and complex. We live in a world with space and time. We dance around and with each other as we should.

Hope you are having a good week. Washington State was moved into Phase 3 of a 4 phase COVID plan. Do you see the light at the end of the tunnel? I do. I returned to the gym. After my first week, I already feel the endorphins back in action.
Take care of yourself- Shannon


https://www.cnbc.com/2017/07/13/harvard-study-heres-how-many-americans-cant-afford-housing.html

Poetry Club Talks…Lawrence Ferlinghetti Part 2

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-fi3zc-fd9993

Topic: Lawrence Ferlinghetti
Host: Ron
Poems: “Spring About to Happen” and “Between Two Cities”
Recorded: March 13, 2021

Ferlinghetti Poems Discussed

This week Poetry Club Talks finishes our discussion about the late poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti.  We take a look at a few of his signature poems, discuss word selection, rhyme and speculate on the author’s intention. Ron is the host.  He shares these thoughts, “The attachments provide 8 poems by Lawrence Ferlinghetti, including his best known and most admired, “constantly risking absurdity,” which I think are representative of his work and will offer a good basis for our discussion.”  Poetry Club enjoyed talking about the work of Ferlinghetti.  Please hit the “LIKE” button and comment.

BIO

“Lawrence Monsanto Ferlinghetti (March 24, 1919 – February 22, 2021) was an American poet, painter, social activist, and the co-founder of City Lights Booksellers & Publishers.[2] He was the author of poetry, translations, fiction, theatre, art criticism, and film narration. Ferlinghetti was best known for his first collection of poems, A Coney Island of the Mind (1958), which has been translated into nine languages, with sales of more than one million copies.[3] When Ferlinghetti turned 100 in March 2019, the city of San Francisco proclaimed his birthday, March 24, “Lawrence Ferlinghetti Day”.[4]”  -Wikipedia

All poems are copyright and owned by Lawrence Ferlinghetti.  Please visit Ferlinghetti’s website to read his full BIO and learn more about this important poet.

http://www.citylights.com/ferlinghetti/

This podcast is produced by Chickadee Productions

Day 350: Absorption

Ferlinghetti, seen in 1982 in San Francisco, rejects the term ‘memoir’ for his new book. Photograph: Chris Felver/Getty Images

“…and I am waiting
for the Age of Anxiety
to drop dead…”

-“I am Waiting” by Lawrence Ferlinghetti, (b. 1919- d. 2021) 

Something funny happened to me the other day.  First off I had a bad day.  Nothing too extreme, just your normal run-of-the-mill bummer of a day.  I was feeling inadequate at work and falling behind in some personal goals.  My little apartment is my sanctuary.  Pulling into my parking space, sitting in the car for a moment to collect myself, the weight of the day became known.  Dang, what a day!

Walked in to set my stuff in the house. Got the mail key. Went out to grabbed the day’s mail. Went back inside. Looked through it at my desk.  It’s Tuesday so grocery flyer day. A bunch of recycling from one box to another. One letter caught my attention immediately—no mistaking it, it was a check.  Inside was a letter from the local book store along with a check for the sale of ten of my poetry books, approximately $65.  The letter explained the 4th quarter payments are late due to accounting circumstances. I was bummed thinking nothing sold last quarter, but, apparently, somethings sold. So, this is good news.  But…I stared at the check and the letter with no exclamation or acknowledgment.  I was still processing my crappy day.  I needed to process my crappy day. I wanted to turn the key from sad to glad right away but instead, I said, “I’ll celebrate tomorrow, or Saturday.”  A voice replied, “Did you just schedule HAPPINESS?” 



Words Under My Skin

Can the lines of a book or poem hug you?  Yes.  Comfort comes in many forms and during this freakin’ pandemic I would guess many of us are seeking comfort in any form we can get it.  I sure am.

A shift that has started in my writing is absorption.  For the previous decade, poems came to me, loudly, processing through my mind and body and shooting out my fingertips to the page.  I appreciated the clarity of the thought.  What’s happening now is I hear the poem and just friggin’ savor it.  I’m keeping the words within me. Like a dissolving lozenge, the flavor slowly works its way through my soul, feeding my very essence.  Sounds dramatic?  It is.  A bit of a mini-drama.  My knee jerks to hurry up and capture the thought on paper, my throat wanting to continue the precious perception, says gently, simply, NO.

Writers have a natural progression, you get an idea you write, or you need to form an idea so you write.  Writers write.  The stanzas coming to me throughout my day and dream time should be placed onto the page. Perhaps the moments are attempts of my psyche to heal the mind and body, acknowledge and absorb the beauty around me, helping me to recover from a bad day.  Maybe I’m just being lazy.  Fresh words and stories come by for a visit and I talk with them and keep them in my heart.

Perhaps we can force another Age of Enlightenment onto the planet? Let’s keep creating and loving each other and see what happens. Have a good day wherever you are. -Shannon

P.S. I was looking forward to perhaps some aliens landing, or a break down of society completely but it looks like the vaccine is coming out and masks are coming off in September (my guess for Bellingham, WA.) *sigh* no fun.

Poetry Club Talks…Lawrence Ferlinghetti Part 1

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-vswwh-fce29c

Topic: Lawrence Ferlinghetti
Host: Ron
Poems: “I Am Waiting”, “The Changing Light”, “Natural History”
Recorded: March 6, 2021

Ferlinghetti Poems Discussed

This week Poetry Club Talks about the late Lawrence Ferlinghetti.  We take a look at a few of his signature poems, discuss tone and form.  Ron is the host.  He shares these thoughts, “The attachments provide 8 poems by Lawrence Ferlinghetti, including his best known and most admired, “constantly risking absurdity,” which I think are representative of his work and will offer a good basis for our discussion.”

BIO

“Lawrence Monsanto Ferlinghetti (March 24, 1919 – February 22, 2021) was an American poet, painter, social activist, and the co-founder of City Lights Booksellers & Publishers.[2] He was the author of poetry, translations, fiction, theatre, art criticism, and film narration. Ferlinghetti was best known for his first collection of poems, A Coney Island of the Mind (1958), which has been translated into nine languages, with sales of more than one million copies.[3] When Ferlinghetti turned 100 in March 2019, the city of San Francisco proclaimed his birthday, March 24, “Lawrence Ferlinghetti Day”.[4]”  -Wikipedia

Please visit Ferlinghetti’s website to read his full BIO and learn more about this important poet.

http://www.citylights.com/ferlinghetti/