September’s Corridor

Holy Smokes! Thank you Village Books, one of Whatcom County’s best independent bookstores, for advertising Corridor in your e-weekly reader last week! Two new poets donated poems this month.

Attention Poets! Corridor is accepting monthly submissions. The deadline is the 5th of each month. Corridor is a limited edition zine that can only be found in local shops around town. Found art connects with strangers in intimate ways.

https://www.villagebooks.com/

Feeling the urge to contribute a poem? Contact me via this website or email poems directly to shannon.chickadee@gmail.com. Ten poems are in each volume. This is a limited edition FREE zine, found in random local stores around Whatcom County.

This month’s contributors are pretty dang impressive.

Vol. 6 Contributors
All poems and art used with permission

COMMUNITY POLICING
TYPHOON

Denise duMaurier

YOU SEE A TREE SPRING INTO FOREST
Lynn Geri

HUMAN — NATURE
MORNING

Linda Conroy

CORRIDOR
IMPOSING

Medium: found-word collage, Info: Instagram @jikleinberg
J.I. Kleinberg

THE MOVING OUT
is the title poem of my seventh poetry collection
published by Salmon Poetry.
John Morgan

SEPTEMBER BELLINGHAM
LEAF TATTOO

Shannon Laws

_____________________

BIOS BIOS BIOS

Lynn Geri is a poet whose words grasp at air, in her wayfaring rise from salty earth. She prefers to grapple ethereal fir in her published works; several journals, anthologies, and books: Mother, Ankhs and Roses, I Submit.

Linda Conroy likes to write about the complexity of the behaviors that make us human, and influence our connection with the natural world, especially in these times of change. She is the author of Ordinary Signs, a poetry collection. Her second collection, Familiar Sky, will be out shortly. She lives in Bellingham.

An artist, poet, and freelance writer, J.I. Kleinberg lives in Bellingham, Washington, USA, and on Instagram @jikleinberg. Her visual poems have been published in print and online journals worldwide.

John Morgan has published seven books of poetry and a collection of essays. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, Poetry, The American Poetry Review, The New Republic, and many other magazines. He divides his time between Fairbanks, Alaska and Bellingham. For more information visit www.johnmorganpoet.com

Kathleen A. McKeever Poet, artist, creator of the Urban Cauldron Tarot Deck. Kathleen’s volumes of poetry Cloudlight, published in 2018 and Body/Today published in 2020 are available by contacting her via urbancauldron@yahoo.com

Shannon Laws, Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat
shannonplawswriter.com

Corridor Vol 4 will knock you out!

Vol. 4 Contributors
All poems and art used with permission

CORRESPONDENCE
first appeared in San Pedro River Review, Fall 2021
PICTURING
[God made me a polished stone]
first appeared in Josephine Quarterly, Spring 2022
Jory Mickelson, Washington

NO, NOT
FREEDOM IN FREE FALL
C. J. Prince, Washington

JUSTICE’S ARCHITECTURE   
Lynn Geri, Washington

SHUTTER
Maria McLeod
, “Shutter” “Skin. Hair. Bones.,”
Finishing Line Press, 2022, page 24.

OMM 1/2
CHEAP REQUESTS
STOUT
Shannon Laws, Washington

Look for copies hiding around the Bellingham core at coffee shops, and book stores.

June’s “Corridor” is OUT

You can find it in local shops around Bellingham starting this week.
Volume 3 featured poems

FIGHTER PILOTS OF THE APOCALYPSE
TRICK RIDER

Denise du Maurier, Washington/Minnesota, U.S.

AT THE DROP OF
C.J. Prince, Washington, U.S.

THE VIEW
GANDER
YES AND

Duncan Shields, British Columbia, Canada

THE MAESTRO VISITS FUKUSHIMA
threat
“Body/Today”, Published 2020
Kathleen McKeever, Washington, U.S.

FOUR MINUS THREE
THE BACK OF MY HAND
“You Love Me, You Love Me Not”, Published 2019
Soundtrack available on Bandcamp & Amazon
Shannon Laws, Washington, U.S.

Corridor Zine Seeks Poems

After two months and two editions, the zine “Corridor” is off and running! Have you found a copy yet? Here is a peek at the covers. Please send in your original poem and/or art by June 15 to be in the next volume. Read up on the details in the post below or click this LINK.

Poetry Club Talks…Seamus Heaney Pt2

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-skuqq-1162636

Topic: Seamus Heaney Pt2
Host: Ron
Poems: “Mid-term Break”, “Villanelle For An Anniversary”, “The Cure of Troy”
Recorded: December 16, 2021

Seamus Heaney Poems

Seamus-Heany_image_Hanvey

Ron guides Poetry Club through another riveting discussion on select poems by Seamus Heaney. Amory and Linda share their experience of attending a reading by Heaney while visiting Ireland.  We take a look at the different rhyme landscapes of his work, moods, mastery of storytelling, and more.  Join us for the deliberation of a much-loved poet.

“Heaney was a professor at Harvard from 1981 to 1997, and its Poet in Residence from 1988 to 2006. From 1989 to 1994, he was also the Professor of Poetry at Oxford. In 1996 he was made a Commandeur of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and in 1998 was bestowed the title Saoi of the Aosdána. Other awards that he received include the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize (1968), the E. M. Forster Award (1975), the PEN Translation Prize (1985), the Golden Wreath of Poetry (2001), the T. S. Eliot Prize (2006) and two Whitbread Prizes (1996 and 1999).[3][4] In 2011, he was awarded the Griffin Poetry Prize and in 2012, a Lifetime Recognition Award from the Griffin Trust.

Heaney is buried at the Cemetery of St Mary’s Church, Bellaghy, Northern Ireland. The headstone bears the epitaph “Walk on air against your better judgement”, from one of his poems, “The Gravel Walks”.[8]”

From Wikipedia:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seamus_Heaney

Poetry Club Talks… is produced by Chickadee Productions

Sleep It Off

Shower Thoughts@TheWeirdWorld

Sleep is kind of like just lying there pretending to be dead until your body is all like: “Fine, but just a little bit”

10:30 AM · Feb 12, 2020·Twitter Web App 635

The link between lack of sleep and cancer is now so strong that the World Health Organization has classified any form of nighttime shift work as a probable carcinogen.” -Mark Walker

HEAT DOME

Hello from the Pacific Northwest one of the hottest places in America…well for three days anyways. Bellingham, where I work, is wayyyy up north, close to the Canadian border. Normally, we experience all four seasons, and temperatures over 85 melt us. Over the next three days the Pacific Northwest will bake under a once-in-a-millennium HEAT DOME. Have you ever heard of a heat dome before? I haven’t. No one has for 1,000 years! Our high temperature today is suppose to be 99, lower than Seattle, Washington’s 104 and our poor southern sister state Portland, Oregon is 107! It’s not the worst that can happen but it is disruptive and dangerous. Nothing to lose sleep over…possibly.

The heat wave baking the U.S. Pacific Northwest and British Columbia, Canada, is of an intensity never recorded by modern humans. By one measure it is more rare than a once in a 1,000 year event — which means that if you could live in this particular spot for 1,000 years, you’d likely only experience a heat dome like this once, if ever.

The core of the heat dome, as measured by the thickness of the air column over British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest, is – statistically speaking – equivalent to a 1-in-1,000-year event or even a 1-in-10,000-year event. photo credit CBS news June 29, 2021


June started off HOT! The Bellingham Herald reports June is a record breaking month, “Bellingham’s 66-year-old record high for the month of June (93 degrees set June 9, 1955) fell Saturday, June 6, at Bellingham International Airport topping out at 94 degrees at 2:53 p.m., with a heat index of 99… That may best the nearly 12-year-old record for the highest temperature ever recorded in Bellingham.” Another “poor problem” for our area. I’ll guess that of the 91,000 residence in this city, probably 30-40% have some form of AC. However, I have to ask if every home and apartment had air cooling on, could our power grid take it? Maybe… It’s difficult for folks without air conditioning to get sleep on these hot summer days. People like me.

I’m thinking about sleep today. I’m daydreaming about getting a good nights sleep this month. Mr. Walker points out in the video above that sleep is a “reset” for the brain & body. He goes on to report that sleep deprivation can affect genes associated with both DNA repair and DNA damage.
I love sleeping and napping. These are my favorite forms of meditation. Since 2019 I’ve put on some extra pounds and my sleeping has been interrupted by um…being fat. The mid-section fat, often accumulated during mid-life, and/or for women during perimenopause, has become my personal nemesis. That and I would like to publicly protest the high cost of a good mattress. A good mattress is a principal tool for a good night’s sleep. However, the starting price is plus $600 for a mattress of “good” quality. This is a high amount to pay for minimum-wage earners; in some states it is half their monthly salary. We already know there is a connection between income and longevity of life, but dang! The dots connect themselves.
Don’t give me that “survival of the fittest” crap.
Having the right conditions for sleep can lead to a longer life. Mr. Walker says there is proof lack of sleep is the gateway to EVERY DISEASE—that’s all, just every frickin’ disease.

“Every disease that is killing us in developed nations has causal and significant links to a lack of sleep,” he says. “So that classic maxim that you may [have] heard that you can sleep when you’re dead, it’s actually mortally unwise advice from a very serious standpoint.”

My goal today is to go in to work early, get office stuff finished by 2:00, run home and melt into a puddle of human slush, or something as close to this as possible. I’ll probably be in bed about 10:00pm after the earth cools.
The heat wave ends this evening, this weather system will slowly dissipate. Don’t let the door hit you on the way out.

NEW TO ME

Last night I attended a monthly poetry open mic on zoom. I discovered a new-to-me poet, Miranda Krogstad who is from Canada. Below is her beautiful poem about love — love in our blood. The DNA saga I documented 2014-2019 captured for me the idea that PEACE is in our DNA and blood. An amazing combination of cultures, history, nations came together to form a living breathing human. The manifestation of LOVE. Miranda expresses it beautifully, as a poet often can. In this video free style dancers interpret her words.

My deep thought today—(inner)Peace and love are powerful weapons to defend ourselves from disease. When we extend peace, patience and love to others they are gifts of LIFE! Please be safe and COOL today.


Live in Compassion & Kindness

“The highest form of knowledge is empathy.” – Bill Bullard

“Carry out a random act of kindness, with no expectation of reward, safe in the knowledge that one day someone might do the same for you.”
– Princess Diana

“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a harder battle.” – Plato

“Sometimes it takes only one act of kindness and caring to change a person’s life.” 
–Jackie Chan

“Whether one believes in a religion or not, and whether one believes in rebirth or not, there isn’t anyone who doesn’t appreciate kindness and compassion.” – Dalai Lama


Sources
https://www.news-medical.net/health/DNA-Damage-Linked-to-Sleep-Deprivation.aspx

https://psychology.berkeley.edu/news/sleep-scientist-warns-against-walking-through-life-underslept-state

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/10/16/558058812/sleep-scientist-warns-against-walking-through-life-in-an-underslept-state

https://www.mirandakrogstad.com/

https://www.sleepfoundation.org/mattress-information/how-much-does-a-mattress-cost

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/heat-wave-dome-2021-seattle-portland-weather/

 

Poetry Club Talks…Rena Priest Part 2

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-bsxbv-1049811

Topic: Rena Priest, Washington State Poet Laureate 2021-22
Host: Ron
Poems: “Toward a Beautiful Flare of Ruin” and “The Perils of Flight”
Recorded: May 23, 2021

Rena Priest_Select Poems

In our discussions, we admire, among many strengths, how thoughtfully Rena’s poems are structured and crafted. The poems in her first book focus on the culture of toxic masculinity she encountered in New York, and the poems in her second reflect her rediscovery of herself in poetry.

Priest was chosen as state poet laureate, says ArtsWA Director, Karen Haman, “for the compelling nature of her poetry and work. She was also chosen for the depth and breadth of her connections to communities and her capacity to further extend these connections through her role as State Poet Laureate.” Priest adds, “My focus will be on visiting tribes, bringing poetry out into the natural world to celebrate beautiful places in Washington, and writing poems based on ecology and environmental restoration and preservation.”

priest 2

BIO

Rena’s first book of poetry “Patriarchy Blues” won the American Book Award.  She is a Lummi tribal member.  She holds an MFA in Writing from Sarah Lawrence College and makes her home in Bellingham, Washington.

All poems copyright by Rena Priest.
Please visit her website to learn more:  https://www.renapriest.com/

Poetry Club Talks… is produced by Chickadee Productions

To The Right

In America, we drive on the right side of the road.  Also, people here generally walk on the right side of the sidewalk, busy hiking trails, even grocery store isles. When I walk along the trails around a nearby lake, I keep to the right side of the path.  If I have the trail to myself, I walk right down the middle as if I owned the place.

What is your neighborhood like during the pandemic? Where I am I have noticed giving another pedestrian 6 feet is seen as a courtesy; in the grocery store, offices, parks, etc., keeping your distance is a sign of good manners. It is awkward or rude if a person stands too close to another. Feathers get ruffled.

Earlier this year, before the snowpack in the mountains could build and the rains of the Northwest La Nina winter began, Padden Gorge Trail was dry and quiet. The creek was all but dried up. The cold air chased away many birds and I experienced the eerie sensation of standing in a silent forest.

To The Right
second draft

The woods are quiet today
I do not hear the rustle of a bird
no wind playing at the leaves
no foraging of a rodent
or the panting of a dog
Padden Creek is down to its
late summer trickle
Everything is off

My ears reach for the sound of people
at the lake trail on end with mine
I hear no one
I haven’t been sleeping lately
For a moment I am dream walking
zombified in this quiet wood
with no direction, no purpose
No others to use as a reference
or provide a sense of direction
No validation of movement
or placement

I walk down the canyon trail in silence.
surrounded by silence

Then–they find me
The crunching roar of off-road bike tires
approach me from behind
I move to the right
The joggers with focused steps
and controlled pants
I move to the right
Two dogs and two owners
come at me head-on
I move to the right
Facedown each time to make sure
my breath does not mix with theirs
Behind me I hear the steps of another walker
I move to the right
I’m a slow walker compared to others
I know this walker will pass me
I wait
no walker
Then turn to look
No one

There are two places on these trails
where the sound tricks the ear
My own steps sound like another
getting ready to pass
but it is just me
and my steps
echoing off the walls
of the thick forest

How nice of me to give the same
courtesy I give others
unknowingly
yet, still as sweet

A Noisey Padden Creek

Feature Photo by Juliane Liebermann on Unsplash

Poetry Club Talks…Composition Styles Part 3

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-pdth8-f5ebb1

Topic: Composition Methods
Host: Ron Leatherbarrow
Poems: “Housekeeper”, “River Ink”, “Her Hands”
Recorded: December 19, 2020

In our final episode exploring personal styles of poetry composition, Shannon shares three poems written at different times, 2010, 2012, 2016, when her style shifted.  Her background in broadcasting plays an unexpected role, not only in her composition but also in the presentation.

Housekeeper, River Ink, & Her Hands

Photo by Amador Loureiro on Unsplash

Copyright ©Poetry Club ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. This blog contains material protected under International and Federal Copyright Laws and Treaties. Any unauthorized reprint or use of this material is prohibited. No part of this blog may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system without express written permission from the author/publisher.

Poetry Club Talks…Methods and Strategies for Composing

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-bgsrw-f2de88

Topic: Methods and Strategies for Composing

Hosted: Ron

Poem: “Altered Landscape” by Ron

Recorded November 14, 2020

Ron puts his money where his mouth is by submitting his own poem (below) for this week’s discussion on strategies for composing.

On a yet uneventful fall morning 
we tuned in, all channels, to news breaking.
We saw the monolithic twins tower
beyond the New York City skyline, higher arching   

emblems of America’s enormous
wealth, unassailable power,
and leadership in world affairs;
and life-source of our nation’s busy-ness    

The planes appeared, at first, 
at the bottom of the screen, 
by their diminutive presence,  
simply to augment the scene,
then, turning toward the center,
disclosed their sinister intent: 
to shatter our national serene    
and apprise us of the error   
of our culture and content,  
by a sacrifice obscene,             
and realize the awful threat of terror.       

then collapse in a cascade more sudden
than our startled eyes and minds could follow    
into a burgeoning mountain of rubble, 
the billowing dust veiling the vast hollow,    

and watched the constant replay, mesmerized,
unable to withdraw our captive sight
or avoid awareness of the massive scale of life
entombed within that monumental blight,    

on the altered landscape of our lives
condemned always to carry the remnants:    
seared mercilessly in each mind’s eye,
the indelible images and events.