Corridor for December

The magical December volume of the poetry zine Corridor will be out next weekend. On the cover is a picture aligned with the old saying “visualize world peace”. Found art is hope incarnated. It hopes that whoever finds it will be slightly better, their vector adjusted perhaps by one degree towards “Better.” Whatever “better” is for you, the Corridor Collective hopes you find it and more.

Vol. 9 Contributors
All poems and art used with permission

IN WINTER – A TRIOLET
Linda Conroy likes to write about the complexity of the behaviors that make us human and influence our connection with the natural world, especially in these times of change. She is the author of Ordinary Signs, a poetry collection. Her second collection, Familiar Sky, will be out shortly. She lives in Bellingham.

DICHOTOMY IN EVENING
CHRISTMAS GIFT
Tyson Higel is a nursing student at Whatcom Community
College, and living in Bellingham, WA. If he’s not with patients or studying his coursework, he is, almost certainly, working on his poems and short stories.

IN SOLITUDE 
Ashok K. Bhargava: Art award-winning multilingual poet; The founder and president of the Writers International Network Canada (WIN Canada); Community activist; public speaker; Former president of Literary Society of BC; Author of six
poetry books and many poetry anthologies.

DEEP ROOTS
Betty Scott equates writing poems with taking road trips. You load up your car with memories and research and take off. You enjoy the scenery, encounter roadblocks, slow down, back up, take a detour, arrive at a friend’s house who suggests ideas for getting back on track and offers shortcuts. So you cut and run, so to speak, speed up, slow down, listen to music, and return home with deeper tread marks on the tires of your mind, including a-pen-on-paper-draft for your next journey.

THE DAY BERNADETTE MAYER DIED
C.J. Prince collects moon verbs, uses star-bidden Oxford commas, and befriends
roses in the darkness.  Her poems hung in the sanctuary of her grandmother’s closet.  She is published in anthologies, journals, and Mother, May I? poetry book among others. Her art is displayed in galleries from Colorado, Washington to Los Angeles, pre-pandemic.

PURPLE VETCH AND WHITE DAISIES
Elizabeth Jane Pryce was born in England but raised in the
Caribbean until she was fourteen years when she returned to
England. She survived the emotional turmoil of cultural changes, a new family, marriage, and three children, before moving to Bellingham. Jane has lived in the same house for thirty years, is a memoirist, a poet, and a landscaper.

SILVER AND GOLD
WARM WINTER
WINTER SUNSET
Shannon Laws discusses poetry on “Poetry Club Talks…” podcast available on YouTube channel “Chickadee PNW” @chickadeeproductions. Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat!
shannonplawswriter.com

Artists Bios

Kathleen A. McKeever Poet, artist, and creator of the Urban Cauldron Tarot Deck. Kathleen’s volumes of poetry Cloudlight, published in 2018, and Body/Today published in 2020 are available by contacting her via urbancauldron@yahoo.com

Susan R. Lytle is a painter that lives in Seattle. Her paintings are inspired by her reverence for nature. You can see more of her work at Rob Schouten Gallery in Langley, Washington, or online at robschoutengallery.com  


Corridor Gives Voice to NW Poets

The November edition of Corridor zine is out this week. Look for it at coffee shops, bookstores, and local businesses.

When I placed some at Village Books on Friday, I noticed all of the extra copies dropped off two weeks ago was gone. I hope those zines are out in the world being read, shared, and doing what found art does, touch hearts and minds.

BIOS BIOS BIOS
Tyson Higel is a nursing student at Whatcom Community
College, and living in Bellingham, WA. If he’s not with pa-
tients or studying his coursework, he is, almost certainly,
working on his poems and short stories.

Elizabeth Jane Pryce was born in England but raised in the
Caribbean until she was fourteen years when she returned to
England. She survived the emotional turmoil of cultural
changes, a new family, marriage, and three children, before
moving to Bellingham. Jane has lived in the same house for
thirty years, is a memoirist, a poet, and a landscaper.

Ashok K. Bhargava: Art award-winning multilingual poet; The
founder and president of the Writers International Network
Canada (WIN Canada); Community activist; public speaker;
Former president of Literary Society of BC; Author of six
poetry books and many poetry anthologies.

Linda Conroy likes to write about the complexity of the
behaviors that make us human and influence our connection
with the natural world, especially in these times of change.
She is the author of Ordinary Signs, a poetry collection. Her
second collection, Familiar Sky, will be out shortly. She
lives in Bellingham.

Kaori Brown lives in Fairhaven. She is a retired Teacher. She
enjoys art journaling and writing poems to go with some of
her work.

Kathleen A. McKeever lives in Sunnyland among a community of
young families collaborating to create the world we desire
for future generations. Poet, artist, and creator of the Urban
Cauldron Tarot Deck.

October’s Corridor

Keep your eyes out for October’s Corridor poetry zine.
NEW contributors, new art, left at new locations!

“The Eternal Flame of Creativity” is this month’s cover
designed by Kathleen McKeever

Vol. 7 Contributors
All poems and art used with permission

NIGHT HUNT
LIGHT BOUND
Direct inquiries regarding the poetry book “Lightbound”
to urbancauldron@yahoo.com
Kathleen McKeever

MIRROR, MIRROR OFF THE WALL
Duncan Shields

FROM A WORD
J.I. Kleinberg

INTERSTATE JOURNEY
Elizabeth Jane Pryce

THE GREAT DANE
Tyson Higel

YESTERDAYS
Becca Lind

MY
Lúthien Tamminga

THE ENCOUNTER
C.J. Prince

ARROYO CREEK
Shannon Laws

BIOS BIOS BIOS

Kathleen A. McKeever Poet, artist, and creator of the Urban Cauldron Tarot Deck. Kathleen’s volumes of poetry “Cloudlight”, published in 2018, and “Body/Today” published in 2020 are available by contacting her via urbancauldron@yahoo.com

An artist, poet, and freelance writer, J.I. Kleinberg lives in Bellingham, Washington, USA, and is on Instagram @jikleinberg. Her visual poems have been published in print and online journals worldwide.

Elizabeth Jane Pryce was born in England but raised in the
The Caribbean until she was fourteen years when she returned to
England. She survived the emotional turmoil of cultural changes, a new family, marriage, and three children, before moving to
Bellingham. Jane has lived in the same house for thirty years, is a memoirist, a poet, and a landscaper.

Tyson Higel is a nursing student at Whatcom Community College and lives in Bellingham, WA. If he’s not with patients or studying his coursework, he is, almost certainly, working on his poems and short stories. 

Rebecca Lind is a healthcare worker with a love for the written word. She spends her free time reading, writing, and listening to music.

Lúthien Tamminga shares, “I write because I love to think. Writing is how I keep in touch with my soul and sit with my emotions. It’s like therapy, and I hope reading this poem made you feel safe, like writing it did for me.” 

C.J. Prince, Poet, author of “Mother, May I?”, and co-author of “Catching My Breath”.  Prince is published in many anthologies and journals and received the Distinguished Poets Award from the Writers International Network, Vancouver, Canada.  Her newest book “Pandamndemic” will be published in 2022.

My Trick Knee

The theme music playing in my head this year. Thank you Marc Rebillet!

This week Oprah, 68, announced that she recently had two knees replaced.  This caught my attention, and brought me out of a blogging sleep, for a few reasons.  First of all, good on her.  I’m delighted that she has good care.  She has folks and friends to guide her through most of life’s changes.  Resourceful, supportive friends and family are as precious as gold in these difficult times.

Thinking about Oprah’s new knees this morning, I want to know more, like HOW long had her knees been hurting before she got the green light for surgery?  Did she ever get the silicone injections?  My guess is that her knees started to hurt her in her 50s.  I’m guessing this because that is what happened to me.  I can’t tell you how many limping gray-haired ladies I see at the grocery store now that I joined the club.  My heart goes out to every one of them. You see, for the last 18 months, I haven’t been able to walk more than half a block without pain. It feels like something very precious was stolen from me. I used to walk all over town, hiking urban and wood trails. It was my way to meditate and relax after a tough day. To quote Talking Heads, “How did I get here?”

Many people, start to develop arthritis as they age.  Arthritis can be a scary word.  A doctor might just tell you, “the lining between your bones is depreciating some.” instead of “You have arthritis.”  The A-word is such a downer.  It’s a downer because there is nothing doctors can do about it. Nothing besides pain control.

Right around age 52, my knees began to hurt but they tricked me.  You see, I thought it was due to my bike accident in 2018, and another gym accident in 2021. I held on to the idea that once I regained muscle mass, and lost all my pandemic weight, I would be back to my 2018 pre-accident body. Easy fix right?  WRONG.

Last four years life gave me an education about aging. I learned some things that I’d like to share with my 66 readers and any other snoopy person who loves a good train wreck.

Beautiful, wonderful nature–come and get me!

Let Auntie Shannon tell you a story…  You see I just stumbled into menopause like an innocent kid paying $1 for the haunted house ride at the fair–I had NO IDEA WHAT WAS INSIDE and thought I’ll take it as it comes.  I’ll la-de-da my way around it convinced menopause was years away for me.  I don’t wish that on you, even though I don’t know you, because I don’t wish for anyone to go through menopause, knee pain, or any other pain alone. So, let’s share in our pain? Well, how about we share experiences and learn from each other.

MENOPAUSE HIDE AND GO SEEK

Look at that “Causes” lady—she does not care. It’s like she’s saying, Screw it. I’m going to unhealthy habit on myself until I’m a rolling dried-up ball of ear wax and wart skin with smoking lines above whatever becomes of my upper lip,
F-it.”

In 2019 the hot flashes, weight gain, and heavy flows began to disrupt my work.  I heard this was typical of the beginnings of menopause, so I visited my doctor.  When my blood work came back she shared, my estrogen levels were too high for me to be menopausal and dismissed the other symptoms as related to the weight gain, or some other unknown disease that she began to test me for.  Meanwhile, the knee pain began to increase.  My doctor was a year away from retirement and it seems stopped giving a shit.  All the uncomfortable occurrences going on in my internal traveling circus were dismissed.  I’m convinced if I had some friends or was closer to my family, someone would have told me “Fire that doctor and go see one who will listen to you!”  ADVICE #1: If you don’t think your doctor listens to you, fire them. If you don’t feel comfortable talking to your doctor find another. Doctors are everywhere. Hundreds in every city across America. You can find a new one that will listen to you, respect what you have to share, listen to your concerns, and answer your questions.

Admittedly, I am not a good patient.  I get nervous around doctors and generally believe they will “sell” me a procedure that is the best option for their pocketbook.  I mean WHAT is their incentive to do otherwise? They are basically a small business.  But–sometimes I’m in pain and don’t know why and I’m freaking’ forced to go see them.  I listen to my body and recognize when something is not right.  Ya, I could just Google the symptoms, but doctors are paid to know ME and give me personalized health care.  For example, after I switched doctors in 2022, I asked the new doctor about hormone therapy to help ease the hot flashes and other issues of menopause.  After looking over my history including a fresh blood panel she shared that I am not a good candidate for hormone therapy. INSIGHT #2: What’s right for others may not be right for you.

BEING FLEXIBLE

But here is Oprah at 68 saying she got two new knees.  Did she flash cash at a doctor and demand new knees?  Most likely not. 

INSIGHT #3: Except for extreme cases, no surgeon wants to give you new knees while you are in your 50’s.  NONE.  

In 85% to 90% of people who have a total knee replacement, the knee implants used will last about 15 to 20 years. This means that some patients who have a knee replacement at a younger age may eventually need a second operation to clean the bone surfaces and refixate the implants.

Modern medical technology has not addressed this problem.  INSIGHT #4: If you have knee pain in your 50s, you will need to suck it up for about 10 years or more, effin’ limping around until you are about 65.  The second operation, if you live that long to get one, is difficult.  My 2022 surgeon explained it to me.  The scar tissue alone from the first surgery makes it difficult to attach the new knee.  You may be a good candidate for a silicone injection that supplements the fluid in your knee to help lubricate and cushion the joint and can provide up to (only) six months of osteoarthritis knee pain relief.  The doctor may offer you anti-inflammatory pills or pills to reduce pain.  A friend might recommend collagen, vitamin C and/or glucosamine and chondroitin supplements.  Shedding pounds, keeping active, and eating well can help—these are your only tools.

I was tricked by menopause, the injury, covid fog, and my own ignorance about aging…but the truth is that arthritis was going to happen regardless of the surrounding circumstances.

Cyberpunk: Edgerunners

I was watching the new Netflix series about the world 55 years from now.  People pay large sums of money for computer implants, enhancements, and new body parts.  True Cyberpunks are completely robotic except for the head and torso.  Apparently, all the leftover fleshy bits are needed for breathing, eating, and making out.  There is a scene where the main character gets his first surgery.  It takes place in a hidden room, deep in a basement, the surgeon is some kind of Frankenstein madman. I’m watching it, with envy and spite. Guess I was born in the wrong century. 



https://www.hss.edu/condition-list_knee-revision.asp#:~:text=In%2085%25%20to%2090%25%20of,surfaces%20and%20refixate%20the%20implants

September’s Corridor

Holy Smokes! Thank you Village Books, one of Whatcom County’s best independent bookstores, for advertising Corridor in your e-weekly reader last week! Two new poets donated poems this month.

Attention Poets! Corridor is accepting monthly submissions. The deadline is the 5th of each month. Corridor is a limited edition zine that can only be found in local shops around town. Found art connects with strangers in intimate ways.

https://www.villagebooks.com/

Feeling the urge to contribute a poem? Contact me via this website or email poems directly to shannon.chickadee@gmail.com. Ten poems are in each volume. This is a limited edition FREE zine, found in random local stores around Whatcom County.

This month’s contributors are pretty dang impressive.

Vol. 6 Contributors
All poems and art used with permission

COMMUNITY POLICING
TYPHOON

Denise duMaurier

YOU SEE A TREE SPRING INTO FOREST
Lynn Geri

HUMAN — NATURE
MORNING

Linda Conroy

CORRIDOR
IMPOSING

Medium: found-word collage, Info: Instagram @jikleinberg
J.I. Kleinberg

THE MOVING OUT
is the title poem of my seventh poetry collection
published by Salmon Poetry.
John Morgan

SEPTEMBER BELLINGHAM
LEAF TATTOO

Shannon Laws

_____________________

BIOS BIOS BIOS

Lynn Geri is a poet whose words grasp at air, in her wayfaring rise from salty earth. She prefers to grapple ethereal fir in her published works; several journals, anthologies, and books: Mother, Ankhs and Roses, I Submit.

Linda Conroy likes to write about the complexity of the behaviors that make us human, and influence our connection with the natural world, especially in these times of change. She is the author of Ordinary Signs, a poetry collection. Her second collection, Familiar Sky, will be out shortly. She lives in Bellingham.

An artist, poet, and freelance writer, J.I. Kleinberg lives in Bellingham, Washington, USA, and on Instagram @jikleinberg. Her visual poems have been published in print and online journals worldwide.

John Morgan has published seven books of poetry and a collection of essays. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, Poetry, The American Poetry Review, The New Republic, and many other magazines. He divides his time between Fairbanks, Alaska and Bellingham. For more information visit www.johnmorganpoet.com

Kathleen A. McKeever Poet, artist, creator of the Urban Cauldron Tarot Deck. Kathleen’s volumes of poetry Cloudlight, published in 2018 and Body/Today published in 2020 are available by contacting her via urbancauldron@yahoo.com

Shannon Laws, Fortis Fortuna Adiuvat
shannonplawswriter.com

Corridor Vol 5

This month one of our regular artists and poets, Kathleen McKeever, asked to run the circuit, dropping the zines off at her favorite places around town. It is fun to sneak a few onto the newspaper rack at cafes and coffee shops, I don’t blame her. August, Volume 5 will be in & around town this weekend. Keep your eyes out for copies!

Vol. 5 Contributors
All poems and art used with permission

LONGINGS
Ashok Bhargava, Vancouver, Canada

[Love is not a lie]
Poem first appeared in Empty House Press, Issue 8
SOMETIMES THE TRUTH: REPRISE
Poem first appeared in Empty House Press, Issue 6
Jory Mickelson, Washington

LUCK OF THE STARS 
EYE WASH

Lynn Geri, Washington

WADE AND SWIM
MRS. NOAH

Both poems from “Body/Today”, Published 2020
Kathleen McKeever, Washington

RIVER INK
MORNING WALK

Shannon Laws, Shannon Laws

BIOs for August

Ashok K. Bhargava: Art award winning multilingual poet; The founder and president of the Writers International Network Canada (WIN Canada); Community activist; public speaker; Former president of Literary Society of BC;
Author of six poetry books and many poetry anthologies.

Jory Mickelson is a trans writer who lives along the I-5 Corridor in Washington state.

Lynn Geri is a poet whose words grasp at air, in her wayfaring rise from salty earth. She prefers to grapple ethereal fir in her published works; several journals, anthologies, and books: Mother, Ankhs and Roses, I Submit. Scroll books: Awe 
and Wonder, Lilies, Romp in the Clover, Searching for Light and Deep Water…where truths ride on watery wind.

Kathleen A. McKeever lives in Sunnyland among a community of young families collaborating  to create the world we desire for future generations. One of her greatest joys has been watching the babies learn to walk and the young people graduate from high school.
Poet, artist, creator of the Urban Cauldron Tarot Deck. Kathleen’s volumes of poetry “Cloudlight“, published in 2018 and “Body/Today“ published in 2020 are available by
Contacting her via urbancauldron@yahoo.com

Shannon Laws produced a poetry discussion podcast during the pandemic, “Poetry Club Talks…”, available wherever you get your podcasts. She writes frequently on the working class, homelessness, the human condition, and romantic relationships. She makes her home in
Bellingham, Washington.

Corridor Vol 4 will knock you out!

Vol. 4 Contributors
All poems and art used with permission

CORRESPONDENCE
first appeared in San Pedro River Review, Fall 2021
PICTURING
[God made me a polished stone]
first appeared in Josephine Quarterly, Spring 2022
Jory Mickelson, Washington

NO, NOT
FREEDOM IN FREE FALL
C. J. Prince, Washington

JUSTICE’S ARCHITECTURE   
Lynn Geri, Washington

SHUTTER
Maria McLeod
, “Shutter” “Skin. Hair. Bones.,”
Finishing Line Press, 2022, page 24.

OMM 1/2
CHEAP REQUESTS
STOUT
Shannon Laws, Washington

Look for copies hiding around the Bellingham core at coffee shops, and book stores.

June’s “Corridor” is OUT

You can find it in local shops around Bellingham starting this week.
Volume 3 featured poems

FIGHTER PILOTS OF THE APOCALYPSE
TRICK RIDER

Denise du Maurier, Washington/Minnesota, U.S.

AT THE DROP OF
C.J. Prince, Washington, U.S.

THE VIEW
GANDER
YES AND

Duncan Shields, British Columbia, Canada

THE MAESTRO VISITS FUKUSHIMA
threat
“Body/Today”, Published 2020
Kathleen McKeever, Washington, U.S.

FOUR MINUS THREE
THE BACK OF MY HAND
“You Love Me, You Love Me Not”, Published 2019
Soundtrack available on Bandcamp & Amazon
Shannon Laws, Washington, U.S.

Corridor Zine Seeks Poems

After two months and two editions, the zine “Corridor” is off and running! Have you found a copy yet? Here is a peek at the covers. Please send in your original poem and/or art by June 15 to be in the next volume. Read up on the details in the post below or click this LINK.

“Corridor” Zine Needs You!

Do you live along the I-5 corridor? Do you write poetry? Do you like to help people? Answer yes to any of those questions and we got lift-off!

I have a simple vision. A 12-page, 5×7, staple bound, free zine sitting there, waiting to be discovered. It is casual, it is no drama, it is free and it says “I love you, you got this.” You have coffee together and it follows you home. You become best friends. Then, a month later, another zine, a new zine appears… How will you break the news to last month’s friend that you found a new friend? Hey, it’s OK. Corridor the zine says, “We can all be friends. Love us all.” See. It’s easy. No drama. Just a little monthly collection of 10 poems to help us during this transition out of isolation. Easy.

THE DETAILS

What: a limited edition coffee house monthly zine called “Corridor”. It gets its name from the I-5 corridor that mimics how thoughts travel through highways of the mind.

Each edition will include 10 thought-provoking poems selected by the Corridor Collective. Each poem should be in a shorter format, no more than one page, with 12 point font maximum, please. If you have “safe for everyone” original print-ready art that would work on a 5×7 format you are welcome to submit it. Submission does not guarantee publication. Poets selected will be notified and receive an electronic copy of the final zine.

I am not going to mass email the zine. The zine is designed to be discovered in a local shop. The zine is stress and drama free.

-me

What is a zine: zines are non-commercial, self-published booklets that are typically reproduced using a copy machine. They provide a safe space for their creator to freely express themselves and share their art, words, and thoughts with a chosen (and often niche) audience.

Type of poems the Corridor Collective is seeking: Poems that provoke deep thought, offer encouragement, entertain, share a story. Content must be friendly to all ages and lifestyles. Poems and art must be original and created by the submitter. Submission does not guarantee publication.

How will people get this zine: The zine will be distributed by hand to various local shops around Whatcom County by the Corridor Collective. The first edition will be about 40 copies. These are Easter Eggs. These are hidden treasures. These will be cherished works of art beloved by many owned by few. Others are welcome to print, staple and distribute copies in their own town. If you want to spread some “Corridor” message me for the PDF here or shannon dot chickadee at gmail dot com.

What should I do when I find it? Please consider supporting the local cafe or store that has copies of “Corridor” when you stop by to get a copy. Even a purchase of $5 is helpful to the brick and mortar and other local businesses during this post-covid transition.

Where do I send my submission: Please send it to shannon dot chickadee at gmail dot com. If you have a specific form, such as a waterfall poem, I suggest sending it as a PDF. I will also take WORD or copy/paste it into the email. I will ask questions if any come up, but I want these zines to be quick, accurate, & easy. 
The poet must tell me how they would like to be acknowledged, how the poem is to be referenced and/or book cited, etc., otherwise it will be marked “anonymous”.

Is there a deadline for submissions: No, not really. Deadlines are so stressful and this zine does not subscribe to stress. The goal is to produce one zine per month and distribute them to local shops and cafes between the 1st – 10th of each month. Submissions that are not selected for one month may appear in the next month. However, if you can get your poem or piece of art to us by the 15th of the month, you have a good chance of appearing in the next month’s edition. Poets selected will be notified. Please send original poems and/or art anytime to shannon dot chickadee at gmail dot com. The Corridor Collective will try to put together random poems that “fit” well together. But that may not happen, and it’s OK. Why? Because it is a no-stress endeavor. We are trusting fate and happenstance, and the suburb science surrounding the coinkydink.

What if the poem I want to submit is old and/or was published: Many things get better with age. If you own the work, then please submit it. Also, remember to tell us how you would like it cited. Example:
Author last name, First name. “Poem Title.”
Book Title, Publisher, Year, Page number(s).
Used with authors permission

How rich will I get: no money is involved. There is no money.

How easy is this: It is easy. It is nice. It is fun. It is an opportunity for the right poem to find the right reader in some random act of kindness way. Easy. As easy as a cat falling asleep on your keyboard.