Corridor Vol 5

This month one of our regular artists and poets, Kathleen McKeever, asked to run the circuit, dropping the zines off at her favorite places around town. It is fun to sneak a few onto the newspaper rack at cafes and coffee shops, I don’t blame her. August, Volume 5 will be in & around town this weekend. Keep your eyes out for copies!

Vol. 5 Contributors
All poems and art used with permission

LONGINGS
Ashok Bhargava, Vancouver, Canada

[Love is not a lie]
Poem first appeared in Empty House Press, Issue 8
SOMETIMES THE TRUTH: REPRISE
Poem first appeared in Empty House Press, Issue 6
Jory Mickelson, Washington

LUCK OF THE STARS 
EYE WASH

Lynn Geri, Washington

WADE AND SWIM
MRS. NOAH

Both poems from “Body/Today”, Published 2020
Kathleen McKeever, Washington

RIVER INK
MORNING WALK

Shannon Laws, Shannon Laws

BIOs for August

Ashok K. Bhargava: Art award winning multilingual poet; The founder and president of the Writers International Network Canada (WIN Canada); Community activist; public speaker; Former president of Literary Society of BC;
Author of six poetry books and many poetry anthologies.

Jory Mickelson is a trans writer who lives along the I-5 Corridor in Washington state.

Lynn Geri is a poet whose words grasp at air, in her wayfaring rise from salty earth. She prefers to grapple ethereal fir in her published works; several journals, anthologies, and books: Mother, Ankhs and Roses, I Submit. Scroll books: Awe 
and Wonder, Lilies, Romp in the Clover, Searching for Light and Deep Water…where truths ride on watery wind.

Kathleen A. McKeever lives in Sunnyland among a community of young families collaborating  to create the world we desire for future generations. One of her greatest joys has been watching the babies learn to walk and the young people graduate from high school.
Poet, artist, creator of the Urban Cauldron Tarot Deck. Kathleen’s volumes of poetry “Cloudlight“, published in 2018 and “Body/Today“ published in 2020 are available by
Contacting her via urbancauldron@yahoo.com

Shannon Laws produced a poetry discussion podcast during the pandemic, “Poetry Club Talks…”, available wherever you get your podcasts. She writes frequently on the working class, homelessness, the human condition, and romantic relationships. She makes her home in
Bellingham, Washington.

“Corridor” Zine Needs You!

Do you live along the I-5 corridor? Do you write poetry? Do you like to help people? Answer yes to any of those questions and we got lift-off!

I have a simple vision. A 12-page, 5×7, staple bound, free zine sitting there, waiting to be discovered. It is casual, it is no drama, it is free and it says “I love you, you got this.” You have coffee together and it follows you home. You become best friends. Then, a month later, another zine, a new zine appears… How will you break the news to last month’s friend that you found a new friend? Hey, it’s OK. Corridor the zine says, “We can all be friends. Love us all.” See. It’s easy. No drama. Just a little monthly collection of 10 poems to help us during this transition out of isolation. Easy.

THE DETAILS

What: a limited edition coffee house monthly zine called “Corridor”. It gets its name from the I-5 corridor that mimics how thoughts travel through highways of the mind.

Each edition will include 10 thought-provoking poems selected by the Corridor Collective. Each poem should be in a shorter format, no more than one page, with 12 point font maximum, please. If you have “safe for everyone” original print-ready art that would work on a 5×7 format you are welcome to submit it. Submission does not guarantee publication. Poets selected will be notified and receive an electronic copy of the final zine.

I am not going to mass email the zine. The zine is designed to be discovered in a local shop. The zine is stress and drama free.

-me

What is a zine: zines are non-commercial, self-published booklets that are typically reproduced using a copy machine. They provide a safe space for their creator to freely express themselves and share their art, words, and thoughts with a chosen (and often niche) audience.

Type of poems the Corridor Collective is seeking: Poems that provoke deep thought, offer encouragement, entertain, share a story. Content must be friendly to all ages and lifestyles. Poems and art must be original and created by the submitter. Submission does not guarantee publication.

How will people get this zine: The zine will be distributed by hand to various local shops around Bellingham, WA by me. The first edition will be about 40 copies. These are Easter Eggs. These are hidden treasures. These will be cherished works of art beloved by many owned by few. If you want to distribute them in your town, message me.

What should I do when I find it? Please consider supporting the local cafe or store that has copies of “Corridor” when you stop by to get a copy. Even a purchase of $5 is helpful to the brick and mortar and other local businesses during this post-covid transition.

Where do I send my submission: Please send it to shannon dot chickadee at gmail dot com. If you have a specific form, such as a waterfall poem, I suggest sending it as a PDF. I will also take WORD or copy/paste it into the email. I will ask questions if any come up, but I want these zines to be quick, accurate, & easy. 
The poet must tell me how they would like to be acknowledged, how the poem is to be referenced and/or book cited, etc., otherwise it will be marked “anonymous”.

Is there a deadline for submissions: No, not really. Deadlines are so stressful and this zine does not subscribe to stress. The goal is to produce one zine per month and distribute them to local shops and cafes between the 1st – 10th of each month. Submissions that are not selected for one month may appear in the next month. However, if you can get your poem or piece of art to us by the 15th of the month, you have a good chance of appearing in the next month’s edition. Poets selected will be notified. Please send original poems and/or art anytime to shannon dot chickadee at gmail dot com. The Corridor Collective will try to put together random poems that “fit” well together. But that may not happen, and it’s OK. Why? Because it is a no-stress endeavor. We are trusting fate and happenstance, and the suburb science surrounding the coinkydink.

What if the poem I want to submit is old and/or was published: Many things get better with age. If you own the work, then please submit it. Also, remember to tell us how you would like it cited. Example:
Author last name, First name. “Poem Title.”
Book Title, Publisher, Year, Page number(s).
Used with authors permission

How rich will I get: no money is involved. There is no money.

How easy is this: It is easy. It is nice. It is fun. It is an opportunity for the right poem to find the right reader in some random act of kindness way. Easy. As easy as a cat falling asleep on your keyboard.

Poetry Club Talks…Sylvia Plath Pt1

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-svhn7-118d091

Topic: Sylvia Plath Pt1
Host: Mike
Poem: “Mad Girl’s Love Song” and “Ella Mason and Her Eleven Cats”
Recorded: January 20, 2022

Sylvia Plath Poems

This week Poetry Club takes on the work and life of Sylvia Plath, an American poet (October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963).  Poetry Club looks past her “sad girl” persona and rejoices in the craft and construction of this mid-20th century poet’s marvelous work.
The range of her work is explored as we compare the energy of “Mad Girl’s Love Song” to “Ella Mason and Her Eleven Cats” in the first of this series.  Plath’s word choice, rhythm, hyperbole, and images are examined.  Join us as we dive into the Queen of Confessional Poetry.

sylvia plath 1

“In 1950, Plath matriculated at Smith College, where she graduated summa cum laude in 1955.

After graduation, Plath moved to Cambridge, England, on a Fulbright Scholarship. In early 1956, she attended a party and met the English poet Ted Hughes. Shortly thereafter, Plath and Hughes were married, on June 16, 1956.

Plath returned to Massachusetts in 1957 and began studying with Robert Lowell. Her first collection of poems, Colossus, was published in 1960 in England, and two years later in the United States. She returned to England, where she gave birth to her children Frieda and Nicholas, in 1960 and 1962, respectively.

In 1962, Ted Hughes left Plath for Assia Gutmann Wevill. That winter, Plath wrote most of the poems that would comprise her most famous book, Ariel.

In 1963, Plath published a semi-autobiographical novel, The Bell Jar, under the pseudonym Victoria Lucas. She died on February 11 of that year.

Plath’s poetry is often associated with the Confessional movement and compared to the work of poets such as Lowell and fellow student Anne Sexton. Often, her work is singled out for the intense coupling of its violent or disturbed imagery and its playful use of alliteration and rhyme.”
https://poets.org/poet/sylvia-plath

Poetry Club Talks… is produced by Chickadee Productions, located in Bellingham, Washington, USA.

This podcast is FREE for all to listen to. Please consider a donation via PayPal or become a Dollar Donor at Patreon.  Thank you.
PayPal Chickadee Productions
Patreon.com/PoetryClubTalks

Poetry Club Talks…Seamus Heaney Pt1

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-eqpjx-1157024

Topic: Seamus Heaney
Host: Ron
Poems: “Digging” and “Follower”
Recorded: December 4, 2021

Seamus Heaney Poems

Ron hosts the discussion of one of his favorite poets, Seamus Heaney.  Seamus Justin Heaney, born April 1939 – died August 30, 2013, was an Irish poet, playwright, and translator. He received the 1995 Nobel Prize in Literature.  We look at the created word pictures and word choice, share about the life and awards of this famous poet.  In part one we begin an exploration of poems that seem to bookend each other.  Will we get to the “root” of their meaning?  Perhaps, or perhaps we’ll save it for part 2. Please join us.

Seamus Heaney in 1971 Photo credit Jack McManus

“Seamus Heaney is widely recognized as one of the major poets of the 20th century. A native of Northern Ireland, Heaney was raised in County Derry, and later lived for many years in Dublin. He was the author of over 20 volumes of poetry and criticism and edited several widely used anthologies. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995 “for works of lyrical beauty and ethical depth, which exalt everyday miracles and the living past.” Heaney taught at Harvard University (1985-2006) and served as the Oxford Professor of Poetry (1989-1994). He died in 2013.”

Please visit https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/seamus-heaney

Poetry Club Talks is produced by Chickadee Productions

Poetry Club Talks…Love Poems, Frost and Pastan

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-8umfb-1137205

Topic: Love Poems Featuring Frost and Pastan
Host: Ron
Poems: “Love Poem”, “The Telephone”, “Two Look At Two”
Recorded: November 13, 2021

Poems for Discussion- Frost and Pastan

mathew-schwartz-3SWQCLmxH1U-unsplash

Ron hosts this stimulating discussion seeking the answer of what constitutes a love poem.  The group considers three unlikely, not typical love poems by Robert Frost and Linda Pastan.  What elements tell the reader they are about love or expressing love?

A flower becomes a telephone with a direct connection to the person you are thinking of.  Does a love poem need to be about romantic love?  Tone, imagination, the figure of speech, and rich imagery all play a part.  Please join us for another tantalizing talk.

Poetry Club is produced by Chickadee Productions

Poetry Club Talks…Jane Hirshfield

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-6j5ys-10f6763

Topic: Jane Hirshfield
Host: Ron and Betty
Poem: “Optimism”, “Things Keep Sorting Themselves” and “A Blessing for Wedding”
Recorded: September 3, 2021

Jane Hirshfield Poems

JaneHirshfield_NickRozsa

Ron and Betty host the discussion on Jane Hirshfield’s poetry.  Ron shares these notes:

“In past meetings, we have discussed several theories of poetics, including
Zapruder, Poe, Wordsworth, Rilke, and others. Other theorists employ
explanation as to their primary technique. JH’s passage is representative of her entire book; it relies heavily on poetic technique to convey poetry’s special use of language, its intentions, and impact. Does her method clarify sufficiently, or, to use her term, does it “satisfy”?”

Touching on these topics, we select three of our favorite poems of Jane’s to discuss.  Join us for an exciting look into the poetry of Jane Hirshfield.

 

10_windows_780345806840827cr.jpg

To learn more about her new book and to purchase a copy, please visit this site:

https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/229023/ten-windows-by-jane-hirshfield/

 

Poetry Club is produced by Chickadee Productions

 

Introduction to Discovery

Here is a poem from my latest book, “You Love Me, You Love Me Not” available on Amazon and at Village Books in Bellingham, WA. The book is an audio book and has a chap book accompaniment. The poem may come across as obvious to some. However, the book and this poem are attempts to explore that level of comfort and communication between two people who can read each other with eyes closed.

Introduction to Discovery

You are a question that must be answered

He touched me
He touched me
The way
I wanted him to
The way
I wished he would
He read my mind
And he touched me

His fingers moved along the ridges
Of my galaxy in search of the ignition
old crate of dynamite
hidden in the shed
sweats with glycerin
delicate to movement
so my love is for you

drop that box! start a bang
kick start a star to life

use all fingers to read
me as a mystery novel
written in Braille
every bump, knob and dip
a conjunction closer to knowing
the riddle of Eve



Poem: The 27th Day

too funny!

The 27th Day
Most of the evil in this world is done by people with good intentions.
-T.S. Eliot

Getting out of my car today I noticed a bee.
A large and fuzzy bumblebee slowly moving its legs
on the parking lot blacktop of my apartment building.

I saw a video once where a person found a honey bee in distress
gave it a little sugar water and it flew away happy.
I thought I would do the same for this fellow-creature.

I raced inside, grabbed a small bowl, and quickly concocted
a love potion of room temperature filtered water
with a pinch of raw, all-natural sugar into the bowl

Without saying a word I stepped up along its side, my feet
ten times its length, my silence like the voice of God shaking
mountains into the sea. A front bee-leg lifted up in proclamation-

STOP! Do not step on me!

I gave it a little at first, pouring my potion near its mouth, then watched
and waited. I looked for movement in the folded cellophane blanketed atop
the black and yellow body. A black thin tongue darted in and out of the puddle.

The rescue a success, I went inside and continued with my evening.
I was quiet about my good deed. The next day I saw it. Flattened. In line with a neighbor’s back tire. Inches from the stain of the dried sweetened water.

The bee did not fly away in search of flowers to bounce on. It did not sleep as I slept, with lighter shoulders knowing everything was reconciled between bee and human. What did I do wrong?

Perhaps it was evil to intervene. Perhaps I poured sugar water onto the ground to restored life, perhaps I gave a dying bee its last drink.

My Walk

This evening I went out for a walk. I walked four blocks in one direction turned right two blocks then came back to my home. It was colder than I was dressed for. Winter is coming.
I’m quietly thankful this evening. It is unexplainable. The Dalai Lama said, “Do not let the behavior of others destroy your inner peace.” Some days it is easier to defend the inner peace layer than others.
I’m wondering when during a casual conversation three American friends will look at each other and say something like, “Remember when everyone had to wear masks?”

Thank you for visiting my site. Please stay safe. Take care-
Shannon

5th Book

I’m feeling some Nina this evening.

Hello,

I have a super announcement–I am working on my 5th book of poetry!  The poems are being selected, polished up and organized now.  Hopefully, by the end of the month, the new collection will be ready for submission. The BLOG tab will be removed once I begin seeking a publisher.  Don’t want old drafts of poems to be confused with final versions.  The title of the book is TBA.

Please consider picking up some poetry on my main page.  Thank you for visiting my site.  When someone “likes” anything I post it sends me to the moon and back!

Thanks-
Shannon

P.S. For about 10 years Washington State has voted by mail.  I voted last week. Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman, who oversees voting says about 004% of our voters did, it appears, try to vote fraudulently. They voted for someone else who had passed away, or they voted more than once. And that was 142 people out of 3.2 million ballots cast.


https://www.npr.org/2020/05/28/864410852/lessons-to-learn-from-washingtons-decades-long-experience-of-mail-in-voting

https://www.audible.com/pd/You-Love-Me-You-Love-Me-Not-Audiobook/B07V82ZBHG

 

Thank You Red Wheelbarrow

So many songs begging Ruth Bader Ginsburg to “hang on” until there is another democrat in the white house.  This one caught my attention.  SNL 2019. 


Thank you Red Wheelbarrow writers for accepting my poem, “Day 53”, for publication in This Uncommon Solitude your upcoming anthology of pandemic poetry.

“We are honored to showcase and share your powerful and poignant words during this unsettling time of crisis.”

 

Day 53
By Shannon Laws

If the world were normal now,
as it may never be again,
I might enjoy the morning.
This morning where I woke,
at 8:37 a.m., ate breakfast
drank coffee in bed, started writing,
and still under the sheets at 11:36.

If this was, let’s say, Friday, September 20, 2019,
I would not label this morning a case of pandemic fatigue,
no—it would be relaxation.

It is what the pre-pandemic modern world
used to refer as a “personal day.”
(remember personal days?)
I could find joy in working at home if all
my neighbors got into their cars and
drove to work this morning!
THEN today would be a special day for me.
But, it is not.

It is day 53 of the lockdown, and there is nothing
but the heavy responsibility of
staying home and
saving lives.

Photo by Wilhelm Gunkel
Photo by Wilhelm Gunkel

 


https://www.history.com/news/ruth-bader-ginsburgs-landmark-opinions-womens-rights-supreme-court

Jury Duty for women as a right-
In 1979, Ginsburg argued Duren v. Missouri, a case in which a Missouri man accused of murder argued he couldn’t get a fair trial because of a law that made jury service optional for women. She told the court that such exemptions didn’t just make the jury pool unfair; it devalued women’s contributions to juries.

Equal pay regardless of sex-
In her 2007 dissent, which she read from the bench (a rare move for any justice), she argued that the Civil Rights Act’s 180-day time limit shouldn’t apply in the case of discriminatory pay since gender-based discrimination can happen gradually. “A worker knows immediately if she is denied a promotion or transfer,” said Ginsburg. “Compensation disparities, in contrast, are often hidden from sight.”